White Paper: Executive Summary

Train Ashland VA

As discussed in yesterday’s post we are writing a White Paper entitled, The Ashland Third Main-Line: Unsafe, Destructive, Costly.

We have prepared an Executive Summary, a copy of which is shown below. We encourage you to send this document — or your version of it — to the project managers. (Go to http://www.save-ashland.org/join/ to learn how to easily do this.)

You can also download this summary in either .docx or .pdf format.

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Track spacing Ashland train VA

Executive Summary

It is planned to increase the number of trains traveling along the eastern rail corridor. One option is to build a third line through the town of Ashland. This suggestion is unacceptable for the following reasons.

Safety: Toxic, Flammable, Explosive Materials

Approximately 50 freight trains pass through Ashland each day. Most of these trains include tank cars carrying ‘Highly Hazardous Chemicals’ — chemicals that are toxic, explosive and flammable. A leak from one of these cars would likely result in many fatalities and/or the destruction of homes and businesses. Squeezing a third rail through town would make an already unsafe situation much, much worse, particularly as the number of tank cars is likely to increase by over 70% and the number of cars on the roads by 80% during the 30 year life span of the project.

Congestion

The substantial increases in freight and rail traffic will result in enormous traffic congestion through the town. This congestion will be much, much worse during the time that they are actually building the track. It will also make it harder for emergency services to move quickly.

Cultural Destruction

It is not possible just to “add a third rail” to the existing two tracks. They were built long before the modern codes were introduced; they are too close to one another and have insufficient buffer space between them and the public highway. Were a third track to be installed not only would it have to meet modern code so would the existing tracks. The footprint would be so wide that many of the homes and businesses in the center of Ashland would have to be destroyed. These buildings are often of great historical value — some of them going back to the Civil War.

Economic Impact

For many years the town of Ashland has been successfully building its “Center of the Universe” economy. The number of restaurants, shops and activities such as Strawberry Faire has been steadily rising. The third rail would wipe out much of that — the town’s economy would wither.

Construction Chaos 

Any attempt to put in a third rail would lead to ceaseless chaos during the years of construction activity. Traffic flows would be endlessly disrupted, Amtrak service would be curtailed, business activities would dwindle and the chance of an accident would go up immensely.

Capital Cost

The capital cost associated with building a third rail while trying to keep existing rail traffic moving is very high.

Taxpayer Cost

The motivation for this project is to provide more capacity for freight trains (there will be no “High Speed” passenger train service — journey times will be the same as they are now). Even though the freight trains are operated by a private company the project will be funded by tax payers.

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White Paper: Attachment A

Ashland High Speed Rail White Paper

I have been asked to provide copies of the White Paper, The Ashland Third Main-Line: Unsafe, Destructive, Costly. This is a large, unfinished document that requires a lot of research. Therefore we are releasing it in sections. The first release includes:

Feel free to download these documents. However I do request that you give us your feedback. Consider issues such as:

  • Is the message clear?
  • Is the document too long/too short?
  • Is it too technical or not technical enough?

Discussions to do with Highly Hazardous Chemicals can lead to anxiety, even alarm. It is not the intent of this White Paper to create concerns of this type — after all, there has been only one major derailment in our area and that occurred in 1969 and did not involve hazardous chemicals and no one was injured.

The following “Disclaimer” at the start of Attachment A makes the same point.

Attachment A to the Ashland Rail White Paper